Journal of Levantine Studies


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What happens when a small group of European sailors set out for a night of merrymaking on the waters of the Bosphorus in 1790?

You can read Avner Wishnitzer's "Shedding Some Darkness on the Light: Night and Night Life in 18th-Century Istanbul" from our Blog to find out!

https://levantine-journal.org/shedding-darkness-light-night-night-life-18th-century-istanbul/
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"The immigrants from Islamic lands did not discern, in the cultural pattern that took shape in Eretz Yisrael and later in the State of Israel, a pattern that suited their needs.Nor did the creators of this pattern consider the cultural patterns of immigrants from Islamic countries to be worthy of integration into the existing pattern."

To read the rest of Inbal Perlson's article "Musicians between the Hegemonies" published in Vol. 2.2, please go to: https://levantine-journal.org/product/musicians-between-the-hegemonies-a-response/
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What was Jerusalem doing in the St. Louis World's Fair of 1904?

The famous St. Louis World’s Fair was a vast celebration of the new century and its promise of a future governed by technological and scientific progress. It is not often remembered that in the heart of this paean to modernity stood an enormous and astonishingly life-like replica of the Old City of Jerusalem.

In this article published in Vol. 2.1, Prof. Millette Shamir examines the preservation and deployment of religious themes and symbols within modernity.

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Let's journey back in time and revisit the 400-year old story of the Moriscos, the Spanish Muslim converts to Christianity, who were expelled from Spain in the early 17th century.

In his article published in Vol. 1.2, Trevor J. Dadson shows that some groups of Moriscos had assimilated or were well on the road to assimilation, and that in their case the expulsion was a human tragedy that was neither inevitable nor necessary.

Available for free download!

https://levantine-journal.org/product/the-assimilation-of-spains-moriscos-fiction-or-reality-2/
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Recently Published:

Vol. 7, No. 1: Summer 2017

Editor's Note | Abigail Jacobson

The current volume of the Journal of Levantine Studies pays tribute to Egyptian Jewish essayist and novelist Jacqueline Shohet Kahanoff by dedicating a thematic discussion to the concept of the Arab-Jew, which is strongly connected to the idea of Levantinism. In her writing Kahanoff considers the dilemmas of Mediterranean Jews and opens the possibilities of imagining a new geographical, political, cultural, and historical space: the Levant. Similarly, the idea of the Arab-Jew reflects the possibilities or impossibilities of the Levant and Levantine belonging. It offers possibilities of thinking beyond the politicized categories of ethnic identity and of considering the Mediterranean as a combination of local and regional histories.2 The three articles and essay presented in this thematic discussion attempt to highlight the Arab-Jew and propose new directions of research on the topic in light of the last decade’s rich scholarship regarding this important part of a Levantine world and identity.

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  • Gender, Religion, and Secularism in the English Mission Hospital of Jerusalem, 1844–1880
    Yali Hashash
    $5.00
  • Hasan and Marika: Screen Shots from a Vanishing Egypt
    Joel Gordon
    $5.00
  • Between Politics and Politics of Identity: The Case of the Arab Jews
    David Tal
    $5.00
  • The Arab Jew Debates: Media, Culture, Politics, History
    Lital Levy
    Free download Download
  • Abandoning Language: The Project of Arab-Jewish Subjectivity in Sami Michael’s Arabic Fiction of the 1950s
    Aviv Ben Or
    $5.00
  • We can't understand ourselves without the Arabic: Dreams in Cambridge (2009)
    Almog Behar
    Free download Download

dock-ument aims to promote the theoretical discourse on topics related to various aspects of the Levant and the concept of the Levant, with preference given to personal essays and to lyrical prose. Its purpose is to encourage various perspectives and unique voices so they can be heard in a way that is not confined by the constraints of scientific discussion. The name, dockument, seeks to express the connection between text and context, between the pier, the home dock, and the ship of thoughts and reflections that will sail, we hope, to various interesting places.

+ Articles
  • Gender, Religion, and Secularism in the English Mission Hospital of Jerusalem, 1844–1880
    Yali Hashash
    $5.00
  • Hasan and Marika: Screen Shots from a Vanishing Egypt
    Joel Gordon
    $5.00
  • Between Politics and Politics of Identity: The Case of the Arab Jews
    David Tal
    $5.00
  • The Arab Jew Debates: Media, Culture, Politics, History
    Lital Levy
    Free download Download
  • Abandoning Language: The Project of Arab-Jewish Subjectivity in Sami Michael’s Arabic Fiction of the 1950s
    Aviv Ben Or
    $5.00
+ Essays
  • We can't understand ourselves without the Arabic: Dreams in Cambridge (2009)
    Almog Behar
    Free download Download
+ Dock-ument

dock-ument aims to promote the theoretical discourse on topics related to various aspects of the Levant and the concept of the Levant, with preference given to personal essays and to lyrical prose. Its purpose is to encourage various perspectives and unique voices so they can be heard in a way that is not confined by the constraints of scientific discussion. The name, dockument, seeks to express the connection between text and context, between the pier, the home dock, and the ship of thoughts and reflections that will sail, we hope, to various interesting places.

+ Reviews


Journal of Levantine Studies

The Journal of Levantine Studies (JLS) is an interdisciplinary academic journal dedicated to the critical study of the geographical, social, and cultural settings which, in various periods of history, have been known as the “Levant.” The journal is published biannually in English in print and online by the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute.