Journal of Levantine Studies


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This week's feature from our Blog: ʿAli Bader's "The Tigris: Nationalism of River and Place: A Suicidal Nation"

For Bader, the Tigris is a medium whose flow combines his personal experiences and memories with those of a city and a society.

"Baghdad is the creation of a river, in fact of two rivers. One may call it Mesopotamia, for instance, at least according to history, as it was thus called by Herodotus. But the second river—I call it ‘second’—in Baghdad, which is the Euphrates, meant absolutely nothing to me at all, neither in my memory nor in my childhood in Baghdad."
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"Most of the Jews who remained in Libya after the great wave of emigration of 1949–1951 continued to live their lives, enjoying many comforts but struggling to maintain their fractured identity as the social space where it existed gradually shrank."

This week's feature from our Blog:

"Sophia Loren and Little Tony: The Leisure Life of the Jews of Tripoli, Libya, in the 1950s and 1960s" by Eyal David

Read in full here: https://levantine-journal.org/sophia-loren-and-little-tony-the-leisure-life-of-the-jews-of-tripoli-l…
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On November 17, the last ISIS-held town in Iraq, Rawa, was liberated by Iraqi forces. Since early 2014, the advance of ISIS in Iraq displaced more than 3 million people, among them the Christians of the Nineveh Plains, considered by many the cradle of Christianity. As ISIS continues to lose one stronghold after another in Iraq, the fate of its Christians has once again come to the forefront.

For a closer look at this minority and its precarious situation, we invite you to revisit Ronen Zeidel's article on the representation of the Christian other in Iraqi novels published in post-2003 Iraq. "The Iraqi Novel and the Christians of Iraq" from Vol. 4, No. 2 now available for free download:

https://levantine-journal.org/product/the-iraqi-novel-and-the-christians-of-iraq/
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Recently Published:

Vol. 7, No. 1: Summer 2017

Editor's Note | Abigail Jacobson

The current volume of the Journal of Levantine Studies pays tribute to Egyptian Jewish essayist and novelist Jacqueline Shohet Kahanoff by dedicating a thematic discussion to the concept of the Arab-Jew, which is strongly connected to the idea of Levantinism. In her writing Kahanoff considers the dilemmas of Mediterranean Jews and opens the possibilities of imagining a new geographical, political, cultural, and historical space: the Levant. Similarly, the idea of the Arab-Jew reflects the possibilities or impossibilities of the Levant and Levantine belonging. It offers possibilities of thinking beyond the politicized categories of ethnic identity and of considering the Mediterranean as a combination of local and regional histories. The three articles and essay presented in this thematic discussion attempt to highlight the Arab-Jew and propose new directions of research on the topic in light of the last decade’s rich scholarship regarding this important part of a Levantine world and identity.

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  • Gender, Religion, and Secularism in the English Mission Hospital of Jerusalem, 1844–1880
    Yali Hashash
    $5.00
  • Hasan and Marika: Screen Shots from a Vanishing Egypt
    Joel Gordon
    $5.00
  • Between Politics and Politics of Identity: The Case of the Arab Jews
    David Tal
    $5.00
  • The Arab Jew Debates: Media, Culture, Politics, History
    Lital Levy
    Free download Download
  • Abandoning Language: The Project of Arab-Jewish Subjectivity in Sami Michael’s Arabic Fiction of the 1950s
    Aviv Ben Or
    $5.00
  • We can't understand ourselves without the Arabic: Dreams in Cambridge (2009)
    Almog Behar
    Free download Download

dock-ument aims to promote the theoretical discourse on topics related to various aspects of the Levant and the concept of the Levant, with preference given to personal essays and to lyrical prose. Its purpose is to encourage various perspectives and unique voices so they can be heard in a way that is not confined by the constraints of scientific discussion. The name, dockument, seeks to express the connection between text and context, between the pier, the home dock, and the ship of thoughts and reflections that will sail, we hope, to various interesting places.

+ Articles
  • Gender, Religion, and Secularism in the English Mission Hospital of Jerusalem, 1844–1880
    Yali Hashash
    $5.00
  • Hasan and Marika: Screen Shots from a Vanishing Egypt
    Joel Gordon
    $5.00
  • Between Politics and Politics of Identity: The Case of the Arab Jews
    David Tal
    $5.00
  • The Arab Jew Debates: Media, Culture, Politics, History
    Lital Levy
    Free download Download
  • Abandoning Language: The Project of Arab-Jewish Subjectivity in Sami Michael’s Arabic Fiction of the 1950s
    Aviv Ben Or
    $5.00
+ Essays
  • We can't understand ourselves without the Arabic: Dreams in Cambridge (2009)
    Almog Behar
    Free download Download
+ Dock-ument

dock-ument aims to promote the theoretical discourse on topics related to various aspects of the Levant and the concept of the Levant, with preference given to personal essays and to lyrical prose. Its purpose is to encourage various perspectives and unique voices so they can be heard in a way that is not confined by the constraints of scientific discussion. The name, dockument, seeks to express the connection between text and context, between the pier, the home dock, and the ship of thoughts and reflections that will sail, we hope, to various interesting places.

+ Reviews


Journal of Levantine Studies

The Journal of Levantine Studies (JLS) is an interdisciplinary academic journal dedicated to the critical study of the geographical, social, and cultural settings which, in various periods of history, have been known as the “Levant.” The journal is published biannually in English in print and online by the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute.